Posted in discernment, theology

Anniversary of An Open Letter To Beth Moore

On June 18, 2019, the following Open Letter to Beth Moore was posted on mine and several other ladies’ blog sites. To date, Mrs Moore has chosen not to directly and clearly answer these very simple questions, questions that any Christian would have a ready answer to, but also ones the Bible says we should. (1 Peter 3:15, Colossians 4:6).

Continue reading “Anniversary of An Open Letter To Beth Moore”

Posted in discernment, theology

An Open Letter To Beth Moore

Dear Mrs. Moore,

Hello – we hope this finds you doing well.

We as female Bible teachers ourselves write this letter to you in hopes of receiving clarification of your views on an important issue: homosexuality.

In the last few years, particularly since 2016, you have been very vocal in your opposition to misogyny and racism. Anytime a story with so much of a whiff of these issues comes to the forefront you are very quick to speak out. The actions of the Covington kids, for example, you said “is so utterly antichrist it reeks of the vomit of hell” in a January 19, 2019 tweet; a tweet you deleted, without apology to the kids, once the full video was shown that portrayed a very different reality than what initial reporting suggested.

It is this Johnny-on-the-spot readiness to engage issues related to misogyny and racism that makes your virtual silence on the issue of homosexuality so puzzling.

To your credit, in your book To Live is Christ: The Life and Ministry of Paul, you wrote, “I met a young man who had experienced freedom from the bondage of homosexuality” (pg. 119). This book was first published in 1997 and then republished in 2008 but it seems since then you have said very little if anything publicly about this issue.

Another factor prompting our open letter to you is the very public mutual affection and admiration between you, Jen Hatmaker and Jonathan Merritt.

Jen Hatmaker and you regularly exchange affirming posts of one another on social media. In just one recent example, Hatmaker on September 17, 2018 wrote “Beth Moore will enjoy my respect and devotion forever. She is worthy of being a mentor to an entire generation. And friends, I wish you knew how deeply and profoundly she has loved me these last two years” (Source). In an interview two years before this post, October of 2016, Jen Hatmaker said she was a “left-leaning moderate,” came out as fully supportive of homosexual marriage (saying it can be “holy”) and said practicing homosexuals can be part of the regenerate body of Christ (Source). It was then that LifeWay decided to pull all of her books from its shelves.

More recently, on April 9, 2019, Jonathan Merritt tweeted, “I no longer believe @BethMooreLPM is a human. I think she is an angelic being having a human experience.” (Source). Jonathan Merritt has admitted to having at least one homosexual encounter about a decade ago (Source). Today, by his own admission he rejects biblical inerrancy, says a “liberal Protestant” would be an accurate description of him, and says his sexual orientation he no longer views as “broken” (Source).

In a crass response to Dr. Owen Strachan tweeting, rightly so, that there should never be an occasion in which men “cuddle” with one another, Merritt on May 1, 2019 tweeted in response, “C’mon, Owen. You can be my little spoon” (Source). Merritt also openly affirms that “queer” and LGBTQ people are included in God’s Kingdom and it is a “carrot of false promises” that the Gospel can make such people straight (Source, Source). He supports “Drag Queen Story Time” in which drag queens read stories to young children in public libraries (Source 27:40 mark– NOTE, the video has already been deleted. Try this one.). He even appears to doubt the exclusivity of Christ (Source).

Both Jen Hatmaker and Jonathan Merritt are known for their belief that practicing homosexuals can be Christians. Given that this is such a deeply held conviction that both share and this conviction (wrong though it is) has cost them both in their standing amongst theologically conservative evangelicals, and that they both praise you so highly, it raises the natural question as to where you stand on this issue.

Given his beliefs, Merritt publicly saying that he believes you to be “an angelic being having a human experience” strongly suggests that his high praise of you is, at least partially, rooted in your views on this issue that you have shared with him privately. It seems most unlikely that he would be praising you so highly if you had told him that as a homosexual man he will perish for all of eternity unless he repents. It likewise seems unlikely that Hatmaker (a married, straight woman) would praise you so highly if you told her that her affirmation of homosexuality and homosexual marriage is sinful and that she must repent.

When all of this is coupled with your total silence on homosexuality (in stark contrast to your very vocal stance on gender/racial/abuse issues) it naturally raises the question as to what your beliefs on it truly are.

With these factors in mind, and knowing that millions of people follow your teachings, we would like to ask you:

  • Do you believe homosexuality is inherently sinful?
  • Do you believe that the practice of the homosexual lifestyle is compatible with holy Christian living?
  • Do you believe a person who dies as a practicing homosexual but professes to be a Christian will inherit eternal life?
  • Do you believe same sex attraction is, in and of itself, an inherently sinful, unnatural, and disordered desire that must be mortified?
  • Why have you been so silent on this subject in light of your desire to “teach the word of God?”

We ask these questions to you out of genuine concern. As Bible teachers, all of us are held to a very high standard and will give an account for how we handle God’s word.

As you know, homosexuality is widely discussed and debated amongst evangelicals and society at large.

Many families are affected by this issue. The most loving thing obedient Christians can do for them is to clearly communicate God’s truth. We look forward to your clarification on these pressing issues.

Thank you.

Kind regards,

Susan Heck
http://www.withthemaster.com/

Debbie Lynne Kespert
http://www.headstickdeb.com/

Michelle Lesley
http://www.michellelesley.com/

Martha Peace
http://marthapeacetew.blogspot.com/

Elizabeth Prata
http://www.the-end-time.org/

Amy Spreeman
https://bereanresearch.org/
https://naomistable.com/

Added:

Kristy Kapp
https://www.narrowmindedwoman.com

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Posted in discernment, Uncategorized

Sources on discerning Jen Hatmaker

Christianity Today is reporting on some news Jen Hatmaker has sparked. Jen Hatmaker is an author and reality television personality whose most famous book, 7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess was reviewed here on The End Time in 2013. That link is below. At that time I engaged in a two part look at Jen Hatmaker. Part 1 was a review of her book. Part 2 was a closer look at her emerging Catholic-based mysticism.

Hatmaker is in the news of late because she has come out solidly for homosexual marriage, claiming it is not only biblical, but can be a holy ordinance. As a result, Christian bookstore LifeWay, an arm of the Southern Baptist Convention, has stopped selling her books.

LifeWay Stops Selling Jen Hatmaker Books over LGBT Beliefs
One of evangelical women’s favorite authors loses her place in one of America’s largest Christian chains.In an interview published Tuesday, the Austin-based author and pastor’s wife told Religion News Service columnist Jonathan Merritt that she supports same-sex marriage and believes that LGBT relationships can be holy. … The Southern Baptist chain stated Thursday that the author’s statements “contradict LifeWay’s doctrinal guidelines,” and it has discontinued selling her books in its 185 stores or online.

Now is a good time to review what makes Hatmaker’s theology aberrant and why she should be avoided.

The following book review published in 2013 at The End Time gives an overview of how Hatmaker approaches the Bible and her response to it.

Book Review & Discernment- “7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess” by Jen Hatmaker, part 1

Part 2 looks at some key phrases in her book which reveal her entrancement with Catholic mysticism and liturgy. If you are a solid teacher of the Bible and a discerning student of it, you will not be promoting practices from false religions. It’s that simple.

Book Review & Discernment- “7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess” by Jen Hatmaker, part 2

Here is another good essay discerning Hatmaker,  written in May 2016 by Timothy J. Hammons, titled Jen Hatmaker’s Messiah Complex. Mr Hammons takes issue with Hatmaker’s flawed view of homosexual sin.

Amy Spreeman at Berean Research posted an article about Hatmaker in January 2016 which references her own essay and re-posts Christine Pack’s essay on Hatmaker, too. Four Concerns about Jen Hatmaker’s Teachings.

Just because a Bible teacher or leader is popular does not mean they are solid. In fact, oftentimes the opposite is true. (Luke 6:26).

As always, think these things through and do your investigations comparing to the Bible. Ask the Spirit for help and wisdom. He will give it!

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him. (James 1:5).