Posted in theology

9/11 is about sin

By Elizabeth Prata

PODCAST AUDIO HERE

Today is the twentieth anniversary of the terror attack on America perpetrated by Muslims seeking to honor their false god Allah. They commandeered planes and used the planes themselves as bombs to plow into skyscrapers and important American buildings, killing the hijacking pilots and all passengers and crew on board, as well as people in the buildings and on the ground.

I remember the event like it was yesterday, an opening phrase no doubt many authors and bloggers are writing today in remembrance. I was working in my newspaper office when my graphic designer called me to another part of the building where the television was. She slowly raised her hand and pointed to it wide eyed and silent. We mutely viewed the gaping hole in the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, hearts beating and minds rushing, as we listened to the reporters try to make sense of it. How could a small plane not see the building? It was a clear day, sparkling and bright. As we watched, 18 minutes later a second plane hit the South Tower. Our heads swung from looking straight ahead at the horror unfolding to each other. Eyes locked, we instinctively knew this was not an accident. It was an attack. The word had not been used yet, but it was obvious. We were under attack.

September 11 Attacks: Bullet Points and Timeline

What does one do when the nation is attacked? How do we respond as citizens? As women? As a mother? As a journalist?

Terrorists had declared war on America and had changed the battlefield and its munitions in a way that took our minds long minutes to catch up. Using a jet airliner AS a bomb? Not combatants, but helpless innocents on board are of no consequence? Impassively looking at the people in the Tower as you purposely drive a jet into them? Their lives gone, their families grieving forever?

We responded initially by being practical. We first crossed the street to buy the biggest flag we could get at the local hardware store and ran it on the pole in front of the office. Then we went to the bank to get money. We didn’t know if we would need to be evacuated. We didn’t know if banks would be shut down, or if there would be a run on the bank. We didn’t know if the economy would collapse.

The bank had the TV on and the second plane had hit the Pentagon and the fourth plan had just hit the ground in Shanksville, PA (a jet which was allegedly intended for the Capitol Building). We glanced at the smoking hole in the ground, drew in a shaky breath, and got on with withdrawing cash. The tellers said nothing, It was eerily silent. This event was too big to allow any speech to come out our mouth, our hearts plugged them and our minds were too frozen in confusion to form words.

Then we got gasoline. Again, evacuation tremors were floating through our mind. We might need to escape to somewhere. We kept glancing up at the sky.

We returned tot he newspaper office and we got to work. We were journalists, and we took free speech very seriously. Free Speech isn’t an abstract blanket overlaid on the nation, it’s a living tapestry knit from individual, red-blooded American journalists who each do their part to ensure a free-flowing pipeline of ideas to crisscross a thriving electorate.

The day after. Photo taken by a friend from the American Legion who was present in NYC that day.

We got the newspaper out that day and we went on with our lives. Vigils were held, candles were lit, discussions were had. All planes were stopped that day, as well as trains and other modes of transport. America closed in as one patriotic heartbeat and cleared the messes at the Pentagon, Shanksville, and especially NYC. Many groups and first responders streamed toward those places in the moments, days, weeks, and months afterward to clean up and rebuild. It was a while before things got back to normal. But that’s what we do. We’re America.

I wasn’t saved then. I noted that in the few Sundays after the event many churches were filled with seekers asking the big questions. I had big questions, too. Where did people go when they died? Why would someone do this? We in our town felt especially aggrieved because we lost a town son in the Pentagon. We were also aggrieved because hijackers Mohamed Atta and Abdulaziz Alomari terrorists had used “our” nearby airport at Portland to get to Boston, where they boarded the fateful plane.

Many headlines then and even today state something like “America changed that day”. We look back on how different we were then and how old we feel now. Old, weary, changed. I am changed massively. I am now saved by grace of Jesus Christ. I have eternal life and a bright future ahead. I have the big questions answered- why are we here? (to glorify God and enjoy Him forever). Where do we go when we die? (heaven if in Christ, hell if not).

John MacArthur on Why did 9/11 happen? (3-min clip)

There are two kinds of deaths: death for the glory of God and death for the maniacal glee of satan. Reader, consider our sin nature and consider the powerful influence of satan. We are all born sinners and sin from the start. (Psalm 51:5). We cannot please God and indeed, we don’t want to. We want to satisfy our lusts and our flesh and indulge our sin. The flesh only has corrupt passions, not holy ones. That’s fine by us- until God intervenes and replaces our corrupt heart with the Holy Spirit and changes our affections.

Satan comes along and whispers to the sinner. Do this. Do that. Adultery is just following your heart. Your heart made a mistake, adultery is just a little correction. Go ahead, steal that. You deserve it. Hate your neighbor? He isn’t worth your love.

How monstrous though, that satan and our flesh can convince ourselves that there is a distant mercurial god named Allah. How grotesque that in wanting to serve this god you rationalize destroying hundreds of millions of dollars of materiel, kill thousands of people, and destroy yourself in the process. We’re not talking about stealing a box of paper clips from work or glancing at a women lustfully. We are talking a mass holocaust of a national emergency and thousands of lives gone in the blink of an eye. Four people caused this. Only 4. Satan was satisfied that day.

Satan is powerful enough to convince a sinner of all these things. Flesh is all too willing to believe that such murder is a service to God.

Jesus said that the zealous Jews would kill them and while doing it think they were offering a service unto God.

They will ban you from the synagogue, yet an hour is coming for everyone who kills you to think that he is offering a service to God. (John 16:2).

For this is not to be understood of their being delivered up into the hands of civil magistrates, and of their being tried, judged, condemned, and put to death by their orders, but of their being murdered by a set of men called "zealots"; who, in imitation of Phinehas, as they pretended, took upon them, whenever they found any person guilty of a capital crime, as idolatry, blasphemy, &c. or what they judged so, to fall upon him at once, and without any more ado kill him; nor were they accountable to any court of judicature for such an action, and which was reckoned laudable and praiseworthy: in this way, and by the hands of such miscreants, Stephen the protomartyr lost his life (Gill's Commentary)

We are all sinners. We are all terrorists in God’s economy, rebelling and usurping and hating Him. Now, we are not all as bad as we all can be, this is obviously true because we are not all flying planes into buildings and thinking that as a mass murderer we are rendering service to our god. However all unsaved people have that potential. Satan knows this. I don’t know what was going through Mohammed Atta’s mind that day as he passed through Portland security, just a few miles where we were busy brewing coffee and setting up the paper for that week’s edition. I was unsaved, he was unsaved. I was diligently offering service to my community with the paper, he was diligently offering service to his false god through murder.

Larry King the TV interview host asked pastor-teacher John MacArthur onto his show days after 9/11. Larry asked JMac, “What does it mean?” That is the basic question of life. It’s never more brought to the fore when something like war, or a holocaust, or a terror attack happens and a lot of people die. What does it mean? JMac replied,

“It means you’re going to die and you’re not in control of when.”

We all live forever. We either dwell in glorified body with Christ in joy, or we dwell in gloomy hellish darkness in body fitted for fiery punishment. The difference in our destination is Christ, through repentance for our sins.

The moment the plane hit the tower and Mohammed Atta and his cohort died, they were catapulted into hellish darkness to eternally burn in fiery punishment for their service to satan. Some who were Christians, like Jim Cleere, were catapulted instantly in to the presence of Jesus. His widow Jean has the hope of reuniting with her lost husband, who they never found, in heaven at the feet of Jesus.

If the difference in our deaths is repentance because of Jesus’ work on the cross, then the result of that difference is eternal hope rather than eternal despair. Christians who have dealt with their sin have the hope of eternal life. Atta hoped he had eternal life, but wasn’t assured of it because no one outside of Jesus can be sure. He discovered his mistake only seconds later, but has an eternity to pay for it. All other sinners, ‘good’ people but unsaved; like waiters in the restaurant at the top of the tower, workers for the government at the Pentagon, brave souls on the PA plane who thwarted the Capitol attack, also joined Atta in hell to pay for their own crimes and treason against the one true God.

It has been twenty years since that day. Atta and anyone else who died on the day outside of Jesus is in hell. Twenty years is nothing. It is but a flash of a moment.

It is everlasting wrath. It would be dreadful to suffer this fierceness and wrath of Almighty God one moment; but you must suffer it to all eternity. There will be no end to this exquisite horrible misery. When you look forward, you shall see a long forever, a boundless duration before you, which will swallow up your thoughts, and amaze your soul; and you will absolutely despair of ever having any deliverance, any end, any mitigation, any rest at all. You will know certainly that you must wear out long ages, millions of millions of ages, in wrestling and conflicting with this almighty merciless vengeance; and then when you have so done, when so many ages have actually been spent by you in this manner, you will know that all is but a point to what remains. So that your punishment will indeed be infinite. Oh, who can express what the state of a soul in such circumstances is! All that we can possibly say about it, gives but a very feeble, faint representation of it; it is inexpressible and inconceivable: for “who knows the power of God’s anger?” (Jonathan Edwards: Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God).

You are going to die. You are not in control of when. The lesson of 9/11 is sin, repentance, hope, and ultimately, Jesus. Jesus saves.

Posted in theology

Suppressing the truth and searing the conscience

By Elizabeth Prata

For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, because that which is known about God is evident within them; for God made it evident to them. (Romans 1:18-19).

What did they suppress, exactly? And where? Or how?

They, meaning unbelievers, deny in their minds that there is a God. They suppress that He made everything in creation. They hate thinking of the fact that He made them, which would mean they are accountable to Him at judgment for their words, their deeds, their lives. They squash their conscience when they do evil.

Continue reading “Suppressing the truth and searing the conscience”
Posted in theology

My son/daughter’s friend came out as gay…how do I help my kid not become desensitized?

by Elizabeth Prata

Kids in high school and especially college co-eds are having a hard time withstanding the tsunami of cultural change with regard to the issues of gender dysphoria, homosexuality, trans-issues, and gender roles. I can’t imagine the deep level of concern that parents of kids these days deal with.

The mama bear wants to protect and guard the kids…the Christian woman in us wants to honor Jesus, and the flesh in us is probably scared to death… The special worry is that kids will become desensitized to these particular sins, because they are being promoted and tolerated so heavily. The Christian life, particularly for parents these days, seems to be one of continual worry and vigilance.

It’s always about sin “out there” – until it rears its head and comes close! What to do when your child’s friend comes out as gay…when a trans person becomes the roommate, when the dorm’s bathroom is unisex, issue isn’t just ‘out there’ any more but touches you or your child’s intimate life? I’m reminded of Jude,

17But you, beloved, ought to remember the words that were spoken beforehand by the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ, 18that they were saying to you, “In the last time there will be mockers, following after their own ungodly lusts.” 19These are the ones who cause divisions, worldly-minded, devoid of the Spirit. 20But you, beloved, building yourselves up on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Spirit, 21keep yourselves in the love of God, looking forward to the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ to eternal life. 22And have mercy on some, who are doubting; 23save others, snatching them out of the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh.

How not to become desensitized to these sins? It would seem to me that when youths are involved via friendship with a person involved in homosexuality (in any form) we look to the end of the verse, ‘having mercy on him with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh.’ Jamieson Fausset commentary says of that part of the verse,

"those who are objects of compassion, whom accordingly you should compassionate (and help if occasion should offer), but at the same time not let pity degenerate into connivance at their error. Your compassion is to be accompanied "with fear" of being at all defiled by them."

Do not let pity degenerate into complicity or acceptance at their error… It’s right to have a concern that youths will become desensitized to sin. They are young enough to have been born post-sexual revolution, where the notion of gay marriage, drag queens, tranvestism and other sexual dysfunctions are common. It always happens, the more a person is around any sin the more their conscience is hardened and it starts to seem normal. That is definitely a legitimate concern.

I often refer to the Jude verse about snatching some from the fire, hating even the garment stained by the flesh, but I’m equally often at a loss as to HOW to do this.

I offer several resources along this vein, which I felt gave advice by example on how to deal with these troubling issues of the day sexual dysphoria, transvestism, homosexuality, transsexuals, etc.

First, I remember Todd Friel of Wretched some years ago making a video contrasting two different reactions to a boy who came out as gay to his dad. One was an actual letter from a Dad responding to his son’s coming out, and the other was from counselor David Murray who was saddened over the Dad’s letter, which had become public. Murray wrote a hypothetical reply as he pondered the actual Dad’s reply, which was harsh. Friel updated the video to include a back and forth email exchange from Emeal Zwayne (“EZ”) who is President of Ray Comfort’s Living Waters ministry, which I loved.

The Zwayne exchange shows HOW to have compassion on a person who is gay and who is combative about it at first, and how EZ extended love- with boundaries and humility- that helped to reach the poor soul.

The next part of Friel’s video goes through the two dads scenario, again I feel it’s instructive by example both in what not to do and what to do, about how to set limits with love, as Jude says, having compassion without being polluted even by the garment. Maybe parents can have explicit talks revolving around these issues, i.e. how to have compassion and be a godly influence without desensitizing toward sin after viewing the limits set in compassion as we hear in Murray’s hypothetical letter.

I also think it helps, as Friel alluded to at the end, that homosexuals know they are in the wrong, Romans 1:18 says they suppress the truth in unrighteousness. I think, keep reminding your kids of that internally and personally but without sermonizing all the time…  (as the combative gay person said in his message to EZ, “I don’t need a sermon…”). Love, earnest listening without openly accepting, and not being a hypocrite ourselves goes a long way to strike a chord with someone who is actively suppressing the truth. Sometimes it doesn’t take much for their exhaustion in suppressing it to collapse as truth explodes into their conscience and bursts out.

I encourage you to watch the video below and see if it suits what you may be dealing with. Cached video below. I don’t know what happened to the actual video on Wretched.org in the two days since I’d seen it and when I went to link it now, it has disappeared from Wretched’s site. Here is the cached version. I hope it keeps working, because it’s a good video. Friel begins the meat of it at 1:04 and ends at 22:48.

Jesus Had Compassion on Sinners. Do We?

Here are the segment breaks and topics:

Segment 1 (0:00) – Are we like Jesus, seeing the lost, the homosexual, the fornicator, and the porn addict with compassion?  Todd introduces a clip from Emeal “E.Z.” Zwayne’s message “EZ Conversation with a Homosexual Man.”  E.Z. shares his compassionate response to a homosexual critical of E.Z.’s preaching.

Segment 2 (10:00) – The conclusion of E.Z.’s message calling for compassion.  Todd introduces clips from a message he shared at Answers in Genesis titled “Letter from Dad,” which contrasts two responses from father’s to their sons who have come out as homosexual.

Segment 3 (17:58) – Todd’s message continues with a compelling question: “Do we respond as conservatives or Christians?”  Todd reads Jerry Bridges’ “Sins We Tend to Overlook,” and closes with a call to engage the lost with compassion.

Next resource: Our Church has Thursday night ‘Table Talks’. Elders present scriptures and issues and we compare to the Bible. The first two weeks was looking at Critical Race Theory and comparing to what the Bible says. The next two weeks was LGBTQ+ issues, sexual issues, gender, and the like. This past week’s video was so good, so illuminating, and so sensitively presented, I link it below. Three of the four elders teach youths in High School or Middle School, and one of them was a college/youth pastor before starting at our church. A great many college kids and young adults represent our church demographic. These men are highly tuned in to the issues of homosexuality and the problem it has become for many of our youths today. The video is an hour. One of our elders speaks rather rapidly, but you can always play with the settings on the video to slow it down. 😉

Link here


Lastly, I offer this sermon from John MacArthur. God’s View of Homosexuality, part 1. MacArthur says of why single out homosexuality as a particular spotlight when there are so many sins God hates-

"I suppose there should be some justification for isolating a sin like this and preaching on it when there are so many sins which are equally heinous to God.  The answer to those who might wonder why we would isolate this one should be apparent, but just in case it isn’t, this sin has taken on unique properties in our culture.  It has been declassified as a sin and turned into a sort of civil rights group.  It is at this particular point a political issue and not a moral one, an issue of freedom and not a moral one or a spiritual one."

America is about to become or already is a post-Christian nation. Even the thin veneer of morality that shallow Christianity had covered our nation with is melting away faster than ice cubes on a July sidewalk. Sins of all types are being normalized, homosexuality among them. Stay in the word of God, pray ceaselessly, and look up for the return of Jesus. After all, today we are one day closer than we’ve ever been before!

Jesus saves, He forgives all sin- there IS life post-gay…post trans…post any sin. Grace abounds.

Posted in Uncategorized

Kay Cude poetry: The Character of Sin

Still Life by Windberg
Still Life by Windberg

Kay Cude is a Texas poet. Published with permission

Artist’s Statement:

I was compelled to say something that spoke encouragement for “the saved to continue on,” even while recognizing and knowing the true character of sin, the taste and its aroma. Our efforts to reach the lost become harder each day; the news-media ridicules Christ’s redeemed, and with deceptive words, demands we not speak Gospel Truth. But we must “continue on.” I must keep fresh in my mind that previous centuries of the lost hated Christ, and that this present century of the lost will hate us (even as we the “saved” seek their rescue).

Posted in theology

Our greatest need

By Elizabeth Prata

It’s troubling times. Our nation just went through a national convulsion from the pandemic, presidential election, and post-election transfer of power. We’ve been experiencing a year-long string of natural disasters, riots, and unexpected tragedies. It’s been tough.

Even the strongest Christian is wobbling from being buffeted back and forth. Pagans are in terror most of the time, whether they will admit it or not.

During troubling times, our natural instinct is to extend sympathy. To put a hand on a shoulder, to cry with those who are crying. We speak a soft word, we exude mercy and grace to those who are suffering, afraid, or scared. We tend toward the “kindness” qualities in our relationships. As we should.

During troubling times it’s also a natural inclination to swing the pendulum too far to the other side. We tend to exclude speaking of our greatest need. We feel it’s ‘not the right time’ to bring up what all humans need, especially to the unsaved.

Continue reading “Our greatest need”
Posted in theology

Who will it be…how will it be?

By Elizabeth Prata

God used pagan leaders for His purposes. Some were good for God’s people and some were bad. Xerxes, Darius, Cyrus vs Antiochus, Herod, Pharaoh …

I don’t know what the next few days will bring. It might be that God uses the Presidential Administration in ways that seem good to us, or he might use evil rulers that seem bad to us. I say ‘seem’ because even in difficult times God ordains evil for His and our good. (Genesis 50:20). So, there’s earthly good and heavenly good and they are not the same, since God’s ways are infinite and above us incomprehensibly. (Isaiah 55:8).

So I do not know what my immediate future holds, but I know my future everlasting future: it is with Jesus in peace and holiness. Perfect justice reigns, perfect love, perfect relationships. There will be no swamp, no corruption, no evil. Satan and his demons will be writhing in the Lake of Fire under eternal punishment, never to harm or influence anyone anymore.

My friend Ekkie Tepsupornchai on social media said:

“Christians understand they live in a fallen world. Part of God’s judgment involves handing sinners over to greater sins (Rom 1:24-32). However, when we see instances of justice, we should give thanks to God as that demonstrates His common grace even over the same fallen society.”

There’s always something to be thankful for.

The End Time photo
Posted in theology

They SHALL be filled…

By Elizabeth Prata

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. (Matthew 5:6).

Barnes’ Notes on the Bible: Blessed are they which do hunger … – Hunger and thirst, here, are expressive of strong desire. Nothing would better express the strong desire which we ought to feel to obtain righteousness than hunger and thirst. No needs are so keen, none so imperiously demand supply, as these. They occur daily, and when long continued, as in case of those shipwrecked, and doomed to wander months or years over burning sands, with scarcely any drink or food, nothing is more distressing. An ardent desire for anything is often represented in the Scriptures by hunger and thirst, Psalm 42:1-2Psalm 63:1-2. A desire for the blessings of pardon and peace; a deep sense of sin, and want, and wretchedness, is also represented by thirsting, Isaiah 55:1-2.

Interesting, isn’t it? When I’m hungry, all I can think about is getting food. When I’m thirsty, I’m not satisfied until I drink. Jesus wants us to be the same way about righteousness. Hunger for it. Thirst for it. Seek filling it. Don’t do anything else until it’s satisfied.

The way John MacArthur described the current state of chaos in “A World Gone Mad” explains a lot of the unsettled feeling I’m having these days. I recommend the article. Here is the excerpt-

On top of the endless chaos surrounding us, our society is drowning in a sea of lies, such that the culture is permeated by a sense of devastating insecurity. We no longer have confidence in politicians, health experts, social activists, academics, or the media—all of them have lost credibility by pursuing agendas over honesty. Even religious leaders have shown a knack for doublespeak and outright deception when it suits their purposes. We have been lied to so routinely that we treat every claim as dubious. Living in that constant state of doubt and suspicion is both exhausting and exasperating.

There are two points. The deplorable state of affairs in America right now is doing a good job of spotlighting sin. The corruption in systems, in people, in society, in organizations is oozing out in more quantity than the Great Molasses Flood of 1919, and a lot of people are getting swept away in its sickening draw.

Sin is ugly, isn’t it? We sinners tend to forget that, having it in us and all around us all the time. We dwell in it, and so, make peace with it, pet it, weakly slay it, only to allow it to return, grinning. But sin is the ugliest thing in the universe. The current scene in America with obvious moral and ethical corruption in academia, politics, law, government, science, and so on shows us that. This is good.

It should make us hunger and thirst for righteousness all the more, shouldn’t it? Seeing sin exposed in its putrid corruption should make us hasten to the cross in agony, pleading for forgiveness for even the most ‘minor’ sins of our own that we’ve committed. If there is anything we can call ‘good’ about the sin-saturated United States, it’s that. When we hold a puppy’s head over his waywardly dropped feces and say “Look at it, just look at it! Bad dog!” God is doing likewise with His children.

Secondly, the last part of the verse: “they shall be filled.” For those that hunger, the promise is not perhaps they will be filled, or maybe they’ll be filled, or later they will be filled. They SHALL be filled. Barnes’ Notes again:

They shall be filled – They shall be satisfied as a hungry man is when supplied with food, or a thirsty man when supplied with drink. Those who are perishing for want of righteousness; those who feel that they are lost sinners and strongly desire to be holy, shall be thus satisfied. Never was there a desire to be holy which God was not willing to gratify, and the gospel of Christ has made provision to satisfy all who truly desire to be holy. See Isaiah 55:1-3Isaiah 65:13John 4:14John 6:35John 7:37-38Psalm 17:15.

The desire to be holy should be in each one of us, if we are saved by His grace. The pursuit of that holiness should be a fervent goal daily. Imagine what a life filled with hunger & thirst for righteousness is like contrasted to the darkness all around!

One who pursues righteousness and loyalty Finds life, righteousness, and honor. (Proverbs 21:21).

They SHALL be filled. And bountifully, too-

EPrata photo


Further Resources:

Adrian Rogers: Rivers of Revival, sermon

John MacArthur: A World Gone Mad, essay

RC Sproul: The Holiness of God, teaching series

RC Sproul, The Trauma of Holiness, sermon (A GOOD ONE!!! I loved this)

Posted in encouragement, Uncategorized

Advent- Thirty Days of Jesus: Day 26, Jesus’ sinlessness

By Elizabeth Prata

This section of verses that show Jesus’ life are focused on His attributes & earthly ministry. We’ve seen Him as servant, teacher, shepherd, intercessor, and healer. We looked at His attributes of omniscience, His authority, and now His sinlessness.

thirty daysof jesus 26

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Further Reading:

The Cripplegate/Nate Busenitz: In what way was Jesus ‘made sin’ on the cross?

GotQuestions: Why does Christ’s righteousness need to be imputed to us?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thirty Days of Jesus Series-

Introduction/Background
Day 1: The Virgin shall conceive
Day 2: A shoot from Jesse
Day 3: God sent His Son in the fullness of time
Day 4:  Marry her, she will bear a Son

Day 5: The Babe has arrived!
Day 6: The Glory of Jesus
Day 7: Magi seek the Child
Day 8: The Magi offer gifts & worship
Day 9: The Child Grew
Day 10: The boy Jesus at the Temple
Day 11: He was Obedient!
Day 12: The Son!
Day 13: God is pleased with His Son
Day 14: Propitiation
Day 15: The gift of eternal life
Day 16: Two Kingdoms
Day 17: Jesus’ Preeminence
Day 18: Jesus is highest king
Day 19: Jesus emptied Himself
Day 20: Jesus as Teacher
Day 21: Jesus as Shepherd
Day 22, Jesus as Intercessor

Day 23: Jesus as Compassionate Healer
Day 24: Jesus as Omniscient
Day 25: Jesus’ authority

Posted in theology

Living a life of death

By Elizabeth Prata


“Behold, all is vanity.”—Ecclesiastes 1:14.

Charles Spurgeon wrote in his Evening Devotional for this date, “NOTHING can satisfy the entire man but the Lord’s love and the Lord’s own self. Saints have tried to anchor in other roadsteads, but they have been driven out of such fatal refuges. Solomon, the wisest of men, was permitted to make experiments for us all, and to do for us what we must not dare to do for ourselves.”

Spurgeon continues -“What! the whole of it vanity? O favoured monarch, is there nothing in all thy wealth? Nothing in that wide dominion reaching from the river even to the sea? Nothing in Palmyra’s glorious palaces? Nothing in the house of the forest of Lebanon? In all thy music and dancing, and wine and luxury, is there nothing? “Nothing,” he says, “but weariness of spirit.”

The Book of Ecclesiastes speaks to me. I sometimes mourn the lost decades of my life before salvation, still knowing

Continue reading “Living a life of death”
Posted in Uncategorized

Kay Cude poetry: The Character of Sin

Still Life by Windberg
Still Life by Windberg

Right-click to open larger in new window. Published with permission

Artist’s Statement:

I was compelled to say something that spoke encouragement for “the saved to continue on,” even while recognizing and knowing the true character of sin, the taste and its aroma. Our efforts to reach the lost becomes harder each day; the news-media ridicules Christ’s redeemed, and with deceptive words, demands we not speak Gospel Truth. But we must “continue on.” I must keep fresh in my mind that previous centuries of the lost hated Christ, and that this present century of the lost will hate us (even as we the “saved” seek their rescue).