Posted in theology

My first reaction to Beth Moore, 2011

By Elizabeth Prata

An official Beth Moore profile photo

In 2011 I was invited to attend a Beth Moore Living Proof Weekend in Charlotte NC. The dear ladies wanted to share with me a female teacher whom they loved and whom they thought would edify me. Curious as to why they were so excited, I went to the weekend experience. I was new to the South and unfamiliar with Beth Moore, even though she was at a height of popularity.

When I returned I wrote up a series reviewing the weekend with my reactions. I requested an appointment with the appropriate church people to share them in private. I certainly did not want to embarrass or antagonize my former church family, but Beth Moore’s teaching was so biblically out of context-twisted, self-absorbed, and legalistic, I couldn’t remain silent. My reactions were my own.

The church’s reaction to my reaction was instantly negative. They were not happy with me. From that point I was labeled a troublemaker, a critical spirit, divisive, and my salvation was questioned. My concerns were not addressed. I was marginalized, and finally at pastoral directive, shunned. It’s a familiar story to many of you. It’s Beth Moore who is divisive, because the result of her teaching is a pile of heaped up followers on one side and marginalized or shunned discerning church women on the other.

At the time in 2011, negative reactions to Beth Moore’s teaching were relatively unheard-of. As mentioned, she was in her height of popularity. Publicly anyway, she seemed universally beloved. I had been in an arena with 12,000 joyous fans shouting praises to Moore, stomping their feet, and singing. I felt like I was the only one shouting to God for help and relief from an oppressively evil atmosphere. (Acts 19:34). I hadn’t found any significant confirmation in my real life spheres, so I went online, which wasn’t a lot more fruitful.

Thank goodness for Pirate Christian Chris Rosebrough, who had reviewed Moore’s Hebrews teaching a few years earlier. The King’s Dale had a few articles, and with those two confirmations plus the Spirit’s gift of discernment to me, I went ahead on my “Avoid Beth Moore” campaign here on my blog, (originally on blogger).

Some years ago, Justin Peters suggested to me that I compile a list of all the reviews of Moore’s teaching, book reviews, and lifestyle critiques, and make a compendium. I did. I call it “All Beth Moore Critiques in One Place.” I include my own writing in the list, and also other women’s essays and reviews, and men/pastors/theologians’. That way, the bulk of the critiques would be in one place for ease of finding, and people would not be able to easily dismiss since there are so many with not all of them written by men. (Dismissing negative reviews of Moore because it was ‘written by a man’ is a common rebuttal, though indefensible).

This week, I went through and checked every link. Some of the links had gone dead, so I found them in the web archive and that’s why some of the links go to a cache. I have centuries-old books on my shelf but 9 year old links are already dead. The internet truly is a temporary repository.

I thought Peters’ was a capital idea, and I add to the list to this day, which has grown to over 70 critiques of Moore’s ‘ministry’ works.

My exhortations since my 2011 introduction to Beth Moore remain the same, “Avoid Beth Moore.” Why? Because she has a healthy amount of followers on her social media platforms, and still gathers a crowd at arenas (when there’s no pandemic). It’s been ten years since my earliest introduction to Beth Moore and during that decade we have seen the ugly and evil fruits of her false ministry. Her influence has been in teaching a terrible hermeneutic, living and promoting a feminist lifestyle, and being an example of usurping that the metaphorical Jezebel in Revelation 2 would probably blush to see. Moore’s form of religion includes false prophesies, new revelation, legalism, Jesus as boyfriend and God as butler, and sadly, how to be a conflict-addicted shrieking harridan (the opposite of what women are called to be, which is to live a quiet life, teaching what is good, and not a busybody).

For people to say Moore just makes a few mistakes, isn’t perfect, or is temporarily off, the answer to that is NO. If a teacher is true, the Spirit will not allow them to continue twisting the precious word of God. He will not allow blasphemy to continue from that teacher’s mouth. He will reprove or correct her. He will do it through the word as she studies, through her pastor or church elders, her friends, or life circumstances that force her take note. The Spirit in a truly converted Christian points to Jesus, not satan. Her errors won’t continue for as long as thirty-plus years, which is how long Moore has been teaching erroneously.

I know that many people have pleaded with Moore to repent, to stop her blasphemies etc, but these pleas have fallen on deaf ears. The Lord has used these failed reproofs to seemingly harden her. She will eventually have to endure the consequences of her life of trading on the good name of Jesus for personal gain. (2 Corinthians 11:15).

Here is a re-posting of my series reacting to my first Beth Moore teaching. It is almost ten years since I wrote the series and a new audience has emerged who may not have come across it. I’ll also post my “All Beth Moore Critiques in One Place” link several times, too. I hope that anyone pausing at this blog long enough to read this will give these exhortations a read and pursue any of the links. Beth Moore is still dangerous, she is still leading many women astray, and it can be said, leading an entire denomination astray, too.

Beth Moore: reactions to Living Proof teaching in Charlotte. Part 1, The Women

Beth Moore: reactions to Living Proof teaching in Charlotte. Part 2, The Music

Beth Moore: reactions to Living Proof teaching in Charlotte. Part 3a, The Teaching

Beth Moore: reactions to Living Proof teaching in Charlotte. Part 3b: The Teaching

Beth Moore: reactions to Living Proof teaching in Charlotte. Part 4: A final word

All Beth Moore critiques here in one place

Posted in discernment, theology

Beth Moore’s Waterfront Mansion for sale

By Elizabeth Prata

Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God. (Matthew 19:24).

On the Fourth of July holiday in 2016, Beth Moore tweeted about how wonderful it was to have all their friends and family with them on the holiday at “a bay house”.

moore tweet bay house

When Beth Moore tweets fun tweets like that, about being unglammed in “a bay house”, she isn’t telling you the whole story. It’s not “a” bay house, it’s Beth Moore’s bay house. A fact she cunningly chose to hide in her carefully crafted tweet. At the date of that tweet, they had bought the waterfront mansion just three weeks prior.

It is a gorgeous waterfront double lot home, 4 bedrooms, a private beach, and more. Continue reading “Beth Moore’s Waterfront Mansion for sale”

Posted in discernment, theology

Beth Moore’s spiritual biography

By Elizabeth Prata

Yesterday I wrote an essay posing the question, ‘Has Beth Moore drifted, or was she always false?‘ In researching for that essay I came across some interesting items that helped me formulate the origins of her theology. I promised to write a follow-up essay noting these items, a spiritual biography, as it were. This is that essay. It’s long, as a biography should be. It is made long also because I used much scripture.

Beth Moore has had a long career writing and teaching Bible studies, speaking, traveling, and preaching. At age 63 as of this writing, she is slowing down with the traveling a bit but her popularity remains and her influence still reaches out globally. She is one of LifeWay’s most favored and money-making writers. As Annette Ard who works for Lifeway stated in 2018, “No one’s products provide as much revenue as Beth Moore’s.” Continue reading “Beth Moore’s spiritual biography”

Posted in discernment, theology

Has Beth Moore only recently drifted, or has she always been false?

By Elizabeth Prata

Follow up essay: Beth Moore’s Spiritual Biography

Answer: Beth Moore is a false teacher. She has always been false.

Who is Beth Moore?

Beth Moore is a Bible teacher based out of Houston. She is married with two grown children, and is a grandmother. Her company is called Living Proof Ministries, a tax-exempt corporation founded in November of 1995. She has written numerous Bible studies and one novel. Moore has a television program on the TBN channel, and also travels around the country teaching at Living Proof Live (LPL) weekends, two-day sessions that fill arenas with enthusiastic women. These LPL attendees are a unique crowd in that some are groupies who follow her from city to city. Others who don’t physically follow Moore from venue to venue but follow her online and her teachings, are fervent in their embracing not only of what Moore teaches but her entire persona. If Moore is critiqued negatively in any way, her followers defend her madly. Continue reading “Has Beth Moore only recently drifted, or has she always been false?”

Posted in discernment, theology

Anniversary of An Open Letter To Beth Moore

On June 18, 2019, the following Open Letter to Beth Moore was posted on mine and several other ladies’ blog sites. To date, Mrs Moore has chosen not to directly and clearly answer these very simple questions, questions that any Christian would have a ready answer to, but also ones the Bible says we should. (1 Peter 3:15, Colossians 4:6).

Continue reading “Anniversary of An Open Letter To Beth Moore”

Posted in encouragement, theology

Modesty: Not just about showing skin

By Elizabeth Prata

birdhouse2

In our area of the world the Spring Equinox begins this Thursday, March 19. It’s already warm outside. The trees and flowers are blooming. The sun is strong. With the warm weather, especially in the south, comes lighter clothing…and with that, the usual essays from Christian women about female modesty.

The Merriam Webster simple definition of modesty is-

1: freedom from conceit or vanity
2: propriety in dress, speech, or conduct

1 Timothy 2:9 says women are to adorn themselves with “respectable apparel” and with “good deeds.” Of course, the former is literal and the latter is figurative. Here’s the full verse-

likewise also that women should adorn themselves in respectable apparel, with modesty and self-control, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly attire,

1 Peter 3:3 also speaks to modesty-

Do not let your adorning be external—the braiding of hair and the putting on of gold jewelry, or the clothing you wear—

The Greek word adorns in the 1 Timothy verse is kosméō, from which we get cosmetics, or, to adorn the face. It’s defined: means make compellingly attractive, very appealing (inviting, awesomely gorgeous).

In the context, Paul is speaking specifically about women’s comportment in public assemblies of worship, but the principles can and should be applied. Matthew Henry wrote:

They must be very modest in their apparel, not affecting gaudiness, gaiety, or costliness (you may read the vanity of a person’s mind in the gaiety and gaudiness of his habit), because they have better ornaments with which they should adorn themselves, with good works.

That’s an important thought, that one can read the vanity in a person’s mind in reading the ‘gaity’ of their dress. Let’s explain it a bit further. God intends modesty to be an attitude of humility. The two are linked.

When Jesus said ‘what comes out of the mouth proceeds from the heart, and this defiles a person’ (Matthew 15:18), it is the same with 1 Timothy 2:9. What manner of apparel we choose to put on the body reflects an attitude of mind and heart.

When we dress ourselves, what is it we want to put on display?

Normally when we think of ‘modesty’ we think of showing skin, like in two-piece skimpy bathing suits, too-short dresses or shorts, midriff shirts, and the like. Older Christian women like me urge the younger to cover the skin. Too much skin on display isn’t modest. Our bodies are a temple of the Holy Spirit. (1 Corinthians 6:19). We are not our own, but belong first to Christ and then if we’re married, to our husbands. (as they belong to us, in a one-flesh union).

We’re not to put our bodies on display, but as in the second part of the 1 Timothy 2 exhortation in verse 10, adorn ourselves with good works.

Modesty isn’t only about whether we’re showing too much skin though. There are other aspects of being modest. I want to speak briefly about too-tight clothing, and of age-appropriate clothing.

I remember when I was about 50 years old. At my job another lady who was also about 50 gave away some of her clothes and asked me if I wanted any. Always looking for an excuse NOT to go shopping, I said “sure, thanks!”

When I got home and opened the bag I was briefly disappointed. It was filled with velour track suits and the like. “These are old lady fashions” I thought to myself.

But wait, I was now an ‘old lady’! It was time for me to re-orient my thinking about how my style should match my age. Just so, if you see a 60 year old woman wearing a baby doll dress, it looks strange, and that’s because it isn’t age-appropriate.

beth moore's outfit at IF 2020 2

beth moore's outfit at IF 2020

Above are two photos of Beth Moore preaching a Bible lesson to the audience at this year’s IF:Gathering. Though technically her skin is covered, the outfit is still immodest. We see the attitude of Moore’s heart isn’t modest, and it isn’t age-appropriate. Her inner attitude is reflected in her choice of clothing. The attitude here is one of shameless body display and total lack of respect for the purpose of her invitation, which was to talk about Jesus. Instead, we see high heel ankle boots, black jeans so tight one can see every hill or valley, and a see-thru sheer blouse. It is immodest. It isn’t age-appropriate.

Moore is a 62 year old grandmother, wearing goth-like apparel more akin to what an unsaved 13 year old would choose.

Her apparel is a choice to display her body to one and all and is of course competing with attention from the One whom she is supposed to value higher than one’s self.

Ladies, in Genesis 3:21 God provided clothing for Adam and Eve. Apparently the fig leaves weren’t enough to cover the body, over which they now felt shame since they had become aware of their nakedness. Clothing is important.

The outward adornment of clothing was used by the biblical writers to signal the inner spiritual nature of God’s people. Once elegantly adorned (Ezek. 16:10–14), Israel sinned and became dressed in filthy rags (Isa. 64:6; Zech. 3:3–4; cp. Rev. 3:4). Those who become righteous are clothed in fine white robes (Zech. 3:4–5; Rev. 3:4–5; 7:9, 13). Source: Wright, P. H. (2003). Fashion, IN Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary (p. 560). Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers.

When you put on clothes during this warm-weather time, or any time, what statement are you making?

Ladies, don’t wear fig leaves. Minimal covering isn’t enough. Men’s brains work overtime to process and enhance what they see visually. Don’t help them along. Be demure, be modest, and keep your body for Christ and for your husband (to be).

Posted in discernment, theology

Testimony from an ex-Beth Moore follower: Lessons about Jesus, but not Jesus Himself

This precious sister whose Twitter handle is CaDaisygirl (@CaDaisygirl), wrote a heartfelt thread about her time when she had followed false teacher Beth Moore. We know and understand that Moore and other false teachers affect a denomination. Their damage impacts wide swathes of professing and true believers. The damage is real.

But what of the lone woman, wandering in a maze of doubt, loneliness, perplexity? What of the negative influence on a woman’s life when she seeks the true Jesus, but isn’t taught? What of her private and individual pain? What happens when the Gospel isn’t even part of the conversation?

Here is CaDaisygirl’s testimony. She asks “that we together remain in prayer that these words would be used to glorify Jesus and bring others out of darkness and into His truth and glorious light. I by no means desire to wound anyone, rather I desire that we learn to put our faith in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.”

—————Testimony—————

I was praying about and for Beth Moore last night and checking my heart in this debate. I followed Beth for many years, a staunch supporter. I read her books, did her studies, and followed her blog.

I realize now that what captured me was, well, quite frankly, Beth.

She was witty, interesting, beautiful, and had that Southern charm. Being her fan was being part of a beautiful club of engaging women who were being drawn towards Jesus. I was a much less mature Christian in those days, and hadn’t yet encountered the depravity of my sin.

From her studies, I learned I was “broken” and a “mess” and that Jesus could fix my messiness, but what I realized in my prayer time last night was that, in all the books I read, and all the studies I did, I was never lead to a saving knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Nowhere did I read that my brokenness and messiness was actually rebellion against God and His Word. Nowhere did I read that the flesh must be crucified with Christ, and it was no longer I who lives, but Christ who lives in me. Galatians 2:20.

Beth’s teachings dance around this concept, but never fully engage it. That is why they are so dangerous. They make you feel good to know about Jesus, without ever directing you how to know Him as Lord and Savior through repentance and surrender and obedience to His Word.

Her teachings are emotional and easy on the soul, but if a non-believer were to study them all, would they know, in the end, what is required to have a saving faith in Christ? Are her followers being drawn into a superficial knowledge of Jesus rather than a saving knowledge of Him?

That is my question and my fear, and that is why I feel compelled to speak about a ministry I so dearly loved at one time. We must use discernment in this day and age. No matter how charming a teacher may be, are they pointing us to salvation?

Are they pointing us to surrender, obedience to God’s Word, and crucifying of the flesh? Are they teaching us to die to self and live for Christ?

If not, why not?

—————End of Testimony—————

I praise the Lord that He draws women out of darkness. Those who follow false teachers are either given over to the lusts that allowed their desires to cloud the truth and they keep heaping up the teachers that speak to those desires, (2 Timothy 4:3) or they are brought out of darkness into the light, seeing satan for the masquerading minister of light that he actually is. (2 Corinthians 2:11)

We warn because of women who wander and remain broken but unaware of their true state and waxing worse due to the false teachers. We warn because of women who are being taught that Jesus is an add-on to their life, a fixer, but who remain unknowing of Him as savior and Lord.

I’m grateful for testimonies as grace-filled as CaDaisygirl’s is. Of her extolling Jesus who saves, who purifies His Bride. I pray her words will help another woman out there who wonders… ‘I’m broken and messy, but why aren’t I ‘fixed’?’ and that she finds true solace in repentance and glorifying Jesus for who He really is.

flowers verse 5a

Posted in encouragement, theology

You say potato, I say potato: Feminism and the Younger Teaching the Elder

By Elizabeth Prata

Rachel Janovic (@lizziejank), put out a 4-min video on encroaching feminism, obedience, submission, and loving our homes. She specifically named Aimee Byrd and @BethMooreLPM as bringers of feminism and disobedience to scripture.

 

Beth Moore snarkily replied with a tweet and a photo.

 

@canonpress and Rachel Jankovic then issued a 2-minute video reply to Moore’s photo. It was brilliant.

 

@BethMooreLPM and her feminist hordes will not win (unless they submit to the Bible’s precepts for obedience and women’s roles.)

As for Moore, you say potato I say potato. It’s too little, too late. She has spent a lifetime in her career of writing and traveling. The Atlantic’s lengthy story on her stated flatly that Moore is “obsessively focused on writing”, traveled so much when her children were little that her children “ate a lot of takeout”, and that her husband picked up home duties. They mention her “publishing career” and her “writing career”, but not her ‘mothering career’. Instead, the writers noted that Moore “balanced motherhood with demanding professional ambitions.”

For a biblical women submissive to her designated role, her ambition should be wifehood/motherhood only, and nothing should compete with that. That was Jankovic’s point.

Allowing personal ambitions to encroach into Godly roles and even compete with them means one has formed her own god and succumbed to the Genesis 3:16b curse and Genesis 4’s warning that sin is crouching at the door and desires to have you. A woman’s ambition is to serve God, in the ways HE has outlined, not the ways we personally desire if those desires are against scripture (and scripture tells us those desires will be).

As for Moore, one look at her face and demeanor will show you instantly what a lifetime of rebellion against God will do to you. It’s interesting that a woman like Moore with 938,700 followers, almost a million, knows and cares what a woman with 3500 followers says about her. As an older women, Moore is supposed to be-

reverent in behavior, not slanderers or slaves to much wine. They are to teach what is good, and so train the young women to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled, pure, working at home, kind, and submissive to their own husbands, that the word of God may not be reviled. (Titus 2:3-5)

It’s pretty sad that here the younger is teaching the older, and the older woman is not responding well. It is a serious, serious thing to rebel against God. One of the outcomes is that His word is reviled, as the verse says. Beth Moore has brought reproach upon Jesus every day of her life since she began teaching men and never stopped, and has only added other sins to her growing pile.

Ladies, I know that home life is sometimes hard. Scrubbing, cooking for hubby, picking up endless toys, changing diapers, wiping noses, isn’t the most glamorous job in the world. We often feel marginalized, that we are missing out, and we’re lonely at times. But it is the most important job in the world. It is a high calling, one that doesn’t show instant rewards, but offers long-term benefits for us all.

Then our sons in their youth will be like well-nurtured plants, and our daughters will be like pillars carved to adorn a palace. (Psalm 144:12)

Fulfill your ministry, model the role with integrity, love the Lord, serve the home, and reap glorious rewards when Jesus looks you in the eye and says “Well done, good and faithful woman.”

Further Reading

What does the Bible say about Christian Mothers?

God’s High Calling for Women

 

Posted in discernment, theology

Being led by the Spirit: What does it mean exactly? Should I expect to hear directly from Him? part 1

By Elizabeth Prata

On Facebook recently I’d posted a mini-discernment lesson regarding a tweet a well-known self-described Bible teacher had written advocating a process for distilling whether a prompt from the Holy Spirit is legitimate or if it’s your own imagination. Continue reading “Being led by the Spirit: What does it mean exactly? Should I expect to hear directly from Him? part 1”

Posted in false teachers, theology

The Unspeakable Pride of False Teachers

By Elizabeth Prata

Regarding the strange video Beth Moore made of herself and posted on Instagram. She filmed herself working out in pajamas, slippers, and bed head. The point of her video was to reassure her followers just how normal she is.

She panned the camera to show her slippers working the step on her elliptical machine, took care to pan up to the lump of bed hair that wouldn’t lay down, and to note that she is still in pajamas, to which she gestured. Continue reading “The Unspeakable Pride of False Teachers”