Posted in discernment, theology

“If I ever meet him I’ll probably sock him in the face” said Jen Wilkin, Redefining Rahab, part 3

By Elizabeth Prata

Annotation2019-12-21110301This 3-part series looks at Jen Wilkin’s “Redefining Rahab” lessons from 2014 and 2018. We have a background & intro part 1, a look at her gender emphasis in the Rahab lesson part 2, and finally this essay, part 3, a look at her academic ethics & her situational ethics from that Rahab lesson. Continue reading ““If I ever meet him I’ll probably sock him in the face” said Jen Wilkin, Redefining Rahab, part 3″

Posted in discernment, theology

“If I ever meet him I’ll probably sock him in the face” said Jen Wilkin, Redefining Rahab, part 2

By Elizabeth Prata

I wrote a 3-part series on Mrs Wilkin, looking at her overall ministry here, herehere. It got long, so I promised to follow up with some specifics from her Rahab teaching lesson. This is that series.

Part 1 here

Part 3 here

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The Rahab lesson

Mrs Wilkin teaches expositionally through books. This is good. She has taught through Joshua recently and also in 2014. In the section concerning Rahab, Wilkin preached a gender message. I am sad to report this. I was fairly shocked with Wilkin’s attitude Continue reading ““If I ever meet him I’ll probably sock him in the face” said Jen Wilkin, Redefining Rahab, part 2″

Posted in discernment, theology

“If I ever meet him I’ll probably sock him in the face” said Jen Wilkin, Redefining Rahab, part 1

By Elizabeth Prata

Introduction

  • Some people come into the church with mal-intent from the start (Galatians 2:4; 2 Peter 2:1; Jude 1:4).
  • Some people who’ve come to faith unknowingly accept false doctrine. (Galatians 1:7).
  • Some believers, due to fear, or apathy, or not knowing what to do, put up with false apostles. (2 Corinthians 11:20 and as a result start to be swayed. (Galatians 2:13)

Falsity spreads its tentacles no matter how it comes, secretly, openly, or when it is known but not opposed. It upsets the faith of some, destroys whole families, and pollutes the church, drawing away its disciples into darkness.

Though it is a heavy responsibility and a constant challenge, incorrect or false teaching must be identified and rejected. It does get wearisome for people to constantly see this one or that one called out as drifting, false, or a heretic. It’s disappointing too. But we must persist. Keep Christ’s name spotless and His faith pure.

Incorrect or false teaching sometimes doesn’t start out as false. It sometimes starts off as good. But without course corrections, satan can take something good and twist it. (2 Peter 3:16). That may be happening with Jen Wilkin.

She admitted in an interview that her foremost motivation is not to teach the Bible to women, it is that she wants women to see what’s possible when a woman teaches them the Bible. It’s gender, not Christ. She said, “One of the most important things that I do when I travel around the country and teach the Bible is actually not that I teach the Bible. It’s that I show up looking like a woman and teach the Bible. Because a lot of women see only men do that.” Underline mine. There is nothing more important than teaching the Bible, for a man or a woman. (2 Timothy 3:16-17)

This 3-part series looks at Jen Wilkin’s “Redefining Rahab” lessons from 2014 and 2018. Part 1 is background & intro, part 2 is a look at her emphasis in the Rahab lesson, and part 3  is a look at her academic ethics & her situational ethics.
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Jen Wilkin bio

Jen Wilkin hit the public scene with her freshman 2014 book, Women of the Word. She is a member of Matt Chandler’s Village Church, and is an Executive Director of Bible Studies at The Village Church Institute, a discipling/teaching arm of the church. Jen writes Bible studies and teaches. She is a nationally known author, and is a sought-after speaker for conferences, podcasts, and other settings. Jen is a wife and mother of 4 adult children.

Jen has stated often that she is a complementarian, and wishes to teach women only, strengthening them in their theological understanding. She decries books “that look like their covers were painted with estrogen”, lol, and pushes for a strong foundation for women in their beliefs. To that end, Jen has made her career and ministry focus by writing books and touring the conference circuit with that message.

However in the past series I wrote, I demonstrated that Wilkin’s complementarianism is in word only. Functionally, she teaches the Bible to men, she trains male pastoral staff, male missionaries and male church planters, (frequently on gender issues), and she speaks before mixed audiences even on a Sunday pulpit.

As we see with ministries with a singular focus, such as end time ministries, ‘deliverance’ ministries, or discernment ministries, the more singular and narrow focus the ministry’s theme is, the more easily it can be twisted away from its center and into something that over time goes far afield from orthodoxy. With Wilkin’s ever more narrowing focus on women and gender, I believe that is what might be happening with Wilkin.

I wrote a 3-part series on Mrs Wilkin, looking at her overall ministry here, here, here. It got long, so I promised to follow up with some specifics from her Rahab teaching lesson. This is that series.

Next, Part 2

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Posted in theology

Boundary Stones and Slippery Slopes: A discerning look at Jen Wilkin, part 3

By Elizabeth Prata

Part 1: Introduction and Method
Part 2: Jen Wilkin’s teaching in the “Menstruation Video”
Part 3: Is Jen Wilkin a Complementarian?

In Part 1 I introduced this three-part series with some of the things I enjoy about Jen Wilkin, and also discussed how I go about reviewing a nationally known teacher’s doctrine, teaching, and lifestyle. In part 2 I took a look at Mrs Wilkin’s now-infamous menstruation eisegesis lesson, and this part 3 I will look at whether she actually lives out her proclamation that she is a complementarian woman, some other discernment issues, and conclude part 3 with a look at what the Lord means when He says do not move the boundary stones. Continue reading “Boundary Stones and Slippery Slopes: A discerning look at Jen Wilkin, part 3”

Posted in discernment, theology

Boundary Stones and Slippery Slopes: A discerning look at Jen Wilkin, part 2

By Elizabeth Prata

In Part 1 I introduced this three-part series with some of the things I enjoy about Jen Wilkin, and also discussed how I go about reviewing a nationally known teacher’s doctrine, teaching, and lifestyle. In this part I’ll take a look at Mrs Wilkin’s now-infamous menstruation eisegesis lesson, and in part 3 whether she actually lives out her insistence that she is a complementarian woman, and conclude part 3 with a look at what the Lord means when He says do not move the boundary stones. Continue reading “Boundary Stones and Slippery Slopes: A discerning look at Jen Wilkin, part 2”

Posted in discernment, theology

Boundary Stones and Slippery Slopes: A discerning look at Jen Wilkin, part 1

By Elizabeth Prata

Part 2
Part 3

Introduction

Hosea 5:10 speaks of moving the property boundary stones.

The princes of Judah have become like those who move a boundary; On them I will pour out My wrath like water. (Hosea 5:10)

So does Deuteronomy.

In the inheritance which you will hold in the land that the Lord your God gives you to possess, you shall not move your neighbor’s boundary marker which men of old have set (Deuteronomy 19:14). Continue reading “Boundary Stones and Slippery Slopes: A discerning look at Jen Wilkin, part 1”

Posted in entertainment, hospitable, hospitality, love

Jen Wilkin explains the difference between entertaining and being hospitable

Part 2 here…

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Jen Wilkin wrote a great essay about the difference between entertaining and being hospitable. Please, PLEASE read it.

We are called to be hospitable. It is a biblical command.

  • Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares. (Hebrews 13:2)
  • Show hospitality to one another without grumbling. (1 Peter 4:9)
  • Contribute to the needs of the saints and seek to show hospitality. (Romans 12:13)
  • But hospitable, a lover of good, self-controlled, upright, holy, and disciplined. (Titus 1:8)
  • And having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work. (1 Timothy 5:10)
  • Is it not to share your bread with the hungry and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover him, and not to hide yourself from your own flesh? (Isaiah 58:7)
  • Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, (1 Timothy 3:2)
  • And day by day, attending the temple together and breaking bread in their homes, they received their food with glad and generous hearts, (Acts 2:46)
The Graphics Fairy

Did you know there were so many references to being hospitable? There are still others, about serving, and lodging with one another and in the OT about not suppressing the sojourner. Being hospitable is important.

I knew a woman who was the most hospitable person I’d ever met. Neither one of us was saved. I am now and she still isn’t so we’re not talking biblical standards here, but still, her loving kindness is ever an example to me. Her house was open to one and all. Jen Wilkin wrote,

Orderly house or not, hospitality throws wide the doors. It offers itself, expecting nothing in return. It keeps no record of its service, counts no cost, craves no thanks. It is nothing less than the joyous, habitual offering of those who recall a gracious table set before them in the presence of their enemies, of those who look forward to a glorious table yet to come. It is a means by which we imitate our infinitely hospitable God.

That was her. The piles of clutter tottered high and were thrown to this corner and that when more people piled in. The table was moved out from the wall, then moved again with a leaf added when more people stopped over. The larder was often bare-bones but the beans and bread was just as tasty as if it had been lobster and caviar. The tea kettle whistled when someone needed sympathy, guitars were broken out when we were joyful and wanted to sing, kids were always included, and there was always laughter. It was convivial and sweet there, always.

No one minded the towels on the bathroom floor, the crumbs on the table or the dishes in the sink. What I remember is the laughter, friendliness, warmth. It was a bright and safe place to berth when seeking refuge in a cold-cruel world.

Jen Wilkin again,

Hospitality involves setting a table that makes everyone feel comfortable. It chooses a menu that allows face time with guests instead of being chained to the cooktop. It picks up the house to make things pleasant but doesn’t feel the need to conceal evidences of everyday life. It sometimes sits down to dinner with flour in its hair. It allows the gathering to be shaped by the quality of the conversation rather than the cuisine. Hospitality shows interest in the thoughts, feelings, pursuits and preferences of its guests. It is good at asking questions and listening intently to answers. Hospitality focuses attention on others.

Pixabay free pics

And there is the Christ-likeness, service in humility and love. I can’t wait for the day when I can be
perfectly hospitable in heaven, when others may come to my room Jesus had prepared for me and I can host them in the name of Jesus in perfect love.

Until that time, I’m not perfect, but as the hospitable season approaches I hope I can display the same loving openness that my friend did. Even more, I’m thankful for the example of generations of warm and loving Christians who have done for my ancestors in the faith. Peter stayed many days in Joppa with Simon the Tanner (nearly three years). (Acts 9:43). Saul/Paul stated with Judas in Damascus on Straight Street. (Acts 9:11). Lydia urged Paul and ensemble to stay at her house,

And after she was baptized, and her household as well, she urged us, saying, “If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come to my house and stay.” And she prevailed upon us. (Acts 16:15).

“her [Lydia’s] faith soon worked by love; and by the fruits of righteousness which followed upon it” (Gill’s Exposition).

Part 2 here…

Posted in new year, theology

Top ten articles and more!

By Elizabeth Prata

I can’t believe two decades have gone by since the infamous Y2K scare. I remember when 1999 turned to 2000. It was said that the world would end, since so many computers had used 2 digits instead of 4, like 99 instead of 1999, and that would crash all the world’s computers when it turned to year 2000. The computers would not know how to handle a prefix of 20 instead of 19. Or something. All I know is that we spent a mountain of money on toilet tissue, preparing to use it as barter money when the zombie hordes came looking for fresh meat. Or something. Continue reading “Top ten articles and more!”

Posted in potpourri, Uncategorized

Prata Potpourri: writers, future husbands, the broken way, just silence, post-sermon discouragement…more

Here are some other bloggers for you, their good thoughts and insights. Enjoy!

For all the hand-wringing we do over the immature state of the next biblical generation coming up, their lack of biblical knowledge causes one to wonder, who will be the next generation of authors, bloggers, editors? Samuel D. James makes 4 requests to young evangelical writers Continue reading “Prata Potpourri: writers, future husbands, the broken way, just silence, post-sermon discouragement…more”

Posted in encouragement, Uncategorized

Prata Potpourri: Books, Books, Books, and Instagram Bible

Bible Reading Plans, Reading Challenges, Reading Resolutions, what’s a girl to do? Read!

Memory moment: A constant accusation against me as a kid was “Why do you always have your nose stuck in a book?” I heard that a lot, from parents, relatives, teachers. Though the teachers may have had a point. I’d put the smaller book by Laura Ingalls Wilder inside the larger tome of Algebra 1 and pretended to follow along in the math lesson. The teacher was not fooled, blast her preternatural senses.

Now that I’m saved, I pray that my nose is always stuck in THE Book, the Bible. Beyond that, reading as a pleasurable activity also engages the mind and stirs the imagination. Reading increases vocabulary, provides conversational topics, and are just plain fun. I’d let reading go to the side for a while but I’m resolving to pick it back up. (Do you see what I did there?)

I loved this piece by Jen Wilkin: Beware The Instagram Bible. She spoke against “The Instagram Bible” which is to say, the tendency for girls and women to post frilly and sentimental verse posts on Instagram, fluffed by flowers and feathers and filters, but ONLY the “loving”and “kind” verses and none of the tougher verses. Wilkin mused that if all the Bibles of the world disappeared and we only had access to scripture via these posted Instagram verses, the Bible would hardly be properly represented.

I’ve written about this before, regarding Church Bulletins, which typically do the same thing. Just once I’d like to see a judgment or wrath verse on a church bulletin.

Are you on the fence about starting a Bible Reading Plan? Yes. Yes I am. I am on day three and I’m already chafing under the self-imposed restrictions I’ve adopted. On the other hand, diligence and discipline do often chafe. So there’s that. I am sticking with it so far. But Jen Oshman has a good take on the whole thing in her article above. BTW, I am tickled I found Jen Oshman and put her on my blogroll before Challies did. There you go, my first boast of 2017. I repent. But it felt so good.

“Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them.” 
― Lemony Snicket, Horseradish: Bitter Truths You Can’t Avoid

 

Victoria Elizabeth Barnes, who is a good and funny writer, shares her latest estate sale find, a mini barrister bookcase. Her photos are gorgeous too. BTW, my former husband had a barrister bookcase, several levels high. It was a cool item, though not as cool as Mrs Barnes’ bookcase, because, well, hers is mini and mini means cute and cute is always cool.

Tim Challies is complementarian and he reads books by women. Gasp! LOL, of course men read books by women and unlike the Tower of Siloam, the hierarchy God has instituted for his church does not come unexpectedly toppling down to crush all in its usurping path. Read more to see why.

Here is Solid Food Ministries with a list of Reading Resources. Their Book Review page. And, their GoodReads page. Check them out!!

What does Samuel James believe is the threat to reading?

This is such an important, and liberating, point. You can’t read it all, and almost certainly shouldn’t try. Indiscriminate buying of books to fill out one’s “personal library” looks great on Instagram, but in practically every circumstance, it undermines the very intellectual pursuit it mimics.

Are your books piled up in stacks around the house? Bookshelves overflowing? 2X4’s on milk crates sagging? No mini-barrister bookcase in sight? Here is a Librarian with a website dedicated to organizing your own personal library. BTW I organize my books by genre and size. If you do it any other way, you’re doing it wrong. Just kidding. Maybe.

“There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.” 
― Joseph Brodsky

A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books. I have this book. It’s on the top left shelf of Bookcase #1. I am too afraid to read it. I have heard that self-diagnosing from the internet isn’t a good idea.

A photo I took of a poster at the famous City Lights bookstore in San Francisco
City Lights Books, San Francisco, EPrata photo